Mirabai: Know Bio, Wiki And More Of A Devotee of Krishna

Mirabai: Know Bio, Wiki And More Of A Devotee of Krishna

Mirabai was a revered Bhakti saint, mystic Hindu poet, and a follower of Krishna. Mira was a devoted devotee of Lord Krishna from her early years and produced a number of lovely poems in celebration of her Lord. Mira was born in the late fifteenth century into a Rajasthani royal family. She wrote a number of “bhajans” that are still sung today by Krishna devotees all over the world. Her life is equally motivating from another angle, though. One could compare her life to the struggles many current women face in order to live the lives they choose. She was young when she was married off to Prince Bhoj Raj of Chittor; as a result, she was expected to live the life of a princess and was compelled to devote her time to household chores. Nevertheless, despite her youth, she maintained her composure and dedicated her life to serving her Lord. She was unable to be deterred from her course by wealth or personal peril. She made the decision to leave her home and move to Vrindavan, where Lord Krishna had spent his formative years, when it became hard to live within the royal household. She spent her time there living the life of a saint, serving Lord Krishna.

Mirabai
Mirabai

 

Early Life Of Mirabai

Mirabai is thought to have been born in the Chaukari village of Merta, a feudal estate in the state of Rajasthan, in the year 1498. However, some sources claim that Kudki, not Chaukari, was where she was born.

The younger son of the king of the land, Rao Dudaji, was Mira’s father, Ratan Singh Rathore. He fought the Mughals for the majority of his time away from home. One story claims that he was killed in battle while still a child. Mira received very little parental love and attention as a child because both her parents passed away when she was around seven years old.

Mira was raised by her devoted Vaishnava grandfather Rao Dudaji. He taught Mira about politics, the government, and religion. She had a strong background in both music and painting.

When Mira’s parents were still alive, she once witnessed a bridegroom being led in a parade to the wedding location. She was drawn to the jamboree like other kids her age were. Little Mira was curious about her fiancé after hearing her mother explain what was going on. Her mother said in jokingly, “You have Lord Krishna as your husband,” at this point. She had no idea how her daughter’s life would be altered by her remarks.

A wandering sage eventually arrived in Merta. He was carrying a Lord Krishna statue. He gave Mira the idol before leaving the fortress town. He showed her how to worship the Lord as well. Mira was overjoyed.

Mira started to treat the idol of Lord Krishna as she would her husband after recalling her mother’s advice. Time passed quickly, and Mira’s love to her Lord deepened to the point where she started to perceive herself as disfigured to Him.

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Who Was The Spouse Of Mirabai?

As Mira grew older, her guardians started looking for a spouse for her. They didn’t care that she imagined herself to be Lord Krishna’s wife. She was given in marriage to Prince Bhoj Raj, the eldest son of Rana Sangram Singh and the crown prince of Mewar, in 1516.

Mira and her spouse and his family moved into the Chittor Fort after being married. However, she continued to view Lord Krishna as her spouse and remained unconcerned with the things of this world.

At first, Bhoj Raj was perplexed and unsure of what to do. He initially made an effort to entice Mira back into the world. Soon enough, he started to value her, and soon after that, a friendship and mutual respect-based connection started to develop between them. Bhoj Raj is rumored to have shielded her young wife from all criticism and encouraged her to create poetry. In order for Mira to serve her Lord at will, he also constructed the temple for Lord Krishna inside the walls of the fort.

Sadly, Bhoj Raj lost his life in a combat in the year 1521. Mira was profoundly affected by the tragedy; in addition to losing a friend, she also lost her mentor and her guardian. There were no kids born to them.

After Bhoj Raj passed away, Mira started spending more time on her spiritual activities. She entertained the deity at the temple for hours with singing and dancing. Commoners who were her devotees traveled from all over to hear her music. The royal household did not take kindly to this and attempted to stop her. Mira didn’t let anything stand in her way, though. She started to focus more and more on the spiritual exercises.

Her father-in-law Rana Sangram Singh also perished in combat within a short time, and her brother-in-law Vikram Singh took over as the monarch of Mewar. Such an outward display of affection infuriated him greatly, and at one point he attempted to lock her in her room. It’s also claimed that he twice attempted to poison her to death, but each time she miraculously survived. In the end, she was banished.

Mira returned to her father’s house first. Her relatives, though, also objected to the way she was acting. Mira made the decision to leave Rajasthan and travel to Vrindavan, where her Lord had lived as a child.

Once in Vrindavan, Mira was unrestricted in her service to her master. She lived a hermit’s life there, creating poetry, conversing with other sages, and associating freely with the followers. She traveled on pilgrimages as well, stopping at locations connected to Lord Krishna.

Everywhere she went, followers crowded around her in hopes of hearing her speak or sing. Her fame started to soar day by day.

When Lord Krishna and his family left their original home at Mathura, they are claimed to have moved to Dwarka, where she spent her final days. Mirabai departed this location in 1547 in order to be with her Lord. It is unclear exactly how Mirabai passed away. She supposedly blended into the Lord Krishna statue and became one with Him, according to mythology.

Trivia Of Mirabai

Mirabai sought out Jeeva Goswami, another Vaishnava saint, once she arrived in Vrindavan. Because he was still used to avoiding ladies at the time, he declined to comply. Mirabai said that the sole man (Purusha) in Vrindavan is Lord Krishna, and the rest are women (Prakriti). Jeeva Goswami agreed and said they should meet. Later, they had lengthy conversations.

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Heritage of Mirabai

The stronghold city of Merta, where Mirabai’s father, Ratan Singh, ruled, was built by Rao Dudaj, a Rajputi. Around 1498, Mirabai was born in Merta, a town in Rajasthan, India’s Kudki district. The predominant deity of the family was Vishnu.

When Mirabai was around four years old, her mother passed away. Mirabai was then raised and taught by her grandparents. She received a strong musical education.

According to mythology, Mirabai was given a Krishna statue by a traveling beggar at a young age, to which she grew emotionally attached.

Marriage Of Mirabai

Mirabai was wed to a Ranjputi prince of Mewar when she was either 13 or 18 years old (sources differ). Her time spent at Krishna’s temple angered her new in-laws. She abandoned her husband and his family on the poet Tulsidas’ letter’s advice. Only a short time after, her husband passed away.

Non-Traditional Widow

The fact that Mirabai did not perform sati, or burn herself alive on her husband’s funeral pyre, as was expected of a Rajputi princess, astonished his family (rani). They were even more startled when she refused to worship the goddess Durga or Kali, the divinity of his family, and to live in seclusion as a widow.

Mirabai enthusiastically embraced Krishna devotion as a part of the Bhakti movement rather than adhering to these conventional conventions for a widowed Rajputi princess. She introduced herself as Krishna’s wife. She disregarded gender, class, caste, and religion barriers, just like many others in the Bhakti movement, and devoted time to helping the underprivileged.

A battle to fend off Muslim invaders resulted in the deaths of Mirabai’s father and father-in-law. Her in-laws and the new monarch of Mewar were frightened by her practice of Bhakti worship. The relatives of Mirabai’s late husband allegedly made repeated attempts on her life. She miraculously avoided being bitten by a poisonous snake, drank poisoned water, and drowned in each try.

Worship Of Mirabai

Mirabai went back to her hometown of Merta, but her family disapproved of her converting to the new Bhaki form of worship of Krishna. Later, in the holy city of Vrindaban, she joined a religious group.

The majority of Mirabai’s contribution to the Bhakti movement came from her music; she produced hundreds of songs and invented a raga, a style of singing. Scholars recognize 200–400 songs as being created by Mirabai, while another 800–1000 have been credited to her. Because Mirabai expressed selflessness by not claiming authorship of the songs, it is unknown who wrote them. The songs were only written down after they had already been composed orally, making it difficult to determine who composed them.

In practically all of her songs, Mirabai portrays herself as Krishna’s wife, expressing her love and devotion to him. Both the joy and the anguish of love are discussed in the songs. Mirabai, a poet’s portrayal of Krishna, alludes metaphorically to the desire of the individual self, atman, to unite with the universal self, or paramatma. Gujarati and Hindi translations of Mirabai’s songs that were originally written in Rajasthani and Braj Bhasa.

Mirabai passed away at Dwarka, another location revered by Krishna, after some time spent wandering.

Religious Movement Of Mirabai

Mirabai became a significant role model in a religious movement that stressed ecstatic devotion and that rejected conventional divisions based on sex, class, caste, and creed because of her willingness to forego family respect and traditional gender, family, and caste restrictions in order to devote herself fully and enthusiastically to Krishna.

According to the custom of her people, Mirabai was merely a “faithful wife” in the sense that she devoted herself to Krishna, her chosen spouse, and gave him the dedication she would not have given to the Rajput prince, her earthly spouse.

was a revered Bhakti saint, mystic Hindu poet, and a follower of Krishna. Mira was a devoted devotee of Lord Krishna from her early years and produced a number of lovely poems in celebration of her Lord. Mira was born in the late fifteenth century into a Rajasthani royal family. She wrote a number of “bhajans” that are still sung today by Krishna devotees all over the world. Her life is equally motivating from another angle, though. One could compare her life to the struggles many current women face in order to live the lives they choose. She was young when she was married off to Prince Bhoj Raj of Chittor; as a result, she was expected to live the life of a princess and was compelled to devote her time to household chores. Nevertheless, despite her youth, she maintained her composure and dedicated her life to serving her Lord. She was unable to be deterred from her course by wealth or personal peril. She made the decision to leave her home and move to Vrindavan, where Lord Krishna had spent his formative years, when it became hard to live within the royal household. She spent her time there living the life of a saint, serving Lord Krishna.
Mirabai

Mirabai is thought to have been born in the Chaukari village of Merta, a feudal estate in the state of Rajasthan, in the year 1498. However, some sources claim that Kudki, not Chaukari, was where she was born.

 

Mirabai
Mirabai

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Father Of Mirabai

The younger son of the king of the land, Rao Dudaji, was Mira’s father, Ratan Singh Rathore. He fought the Mughals for the majority of his time away from home. One story claims that he was killed in battle while still a child. Mira received very little parental love and attention as a child because both her parents passed away when she was around seven years old.

Mira was raised by her devoted Vaishnava grandfather Rao Dudaji. He taught Mira about politics, the government, and religion. She had a strong background in both music and painting.

When Mira’s parents were still alive, she once witnessed a bridegroom being led in a parade to the wedding location. She was drawn to the jamboree like other kids her age were. Little Mira was curious about her fiancé after hearing her mother explain what was going on. Her mother said in jokingly, “You have Lord Krishna as your husband,” at this point. She had no idea how her daughter’s life would be altered by her remarks.

A wandering sage eventually arrived in Merta. He was carrying a Lord Krishna statue. He gave Mira the idol before leaving the fortress town. He showed her how to worship the Lord as well. Mira was overjoyed.

Mira started to treat the idol of Lord Krishna as she would her husband after recalling her mother’s advice. Time passed quickly, and Mira’s love to her Lord deepened to the point where she started to perceive herself as disfigured to Him.

At first, Bhoj Raj was perplexed and unsure of what to do. He initially made an effort to entice Mira back into the world. Soon enough, he started to value her, and soon after that, a friendship and mutual respect-based connection started to develop between them. Bhoj Raj is rumored to have shielded her young wife from all criticism and encouraged her to create poetry. In order for Mira to serve her Lord at will, he also constructed the temple for Lord Krishna inside the walls of the fort.

Sadly, Bhoj Raj lost his life in a combat in the year 1521. Mira was profoundly affected by the tragedy; in addition to losing a friend, she also lost her mentor and her guardian. There were no kids born to them.

After Bhoj Raj passed away, Mira started spending more time on her spiritual activities. She entertained the deity at the temple for hours with singing and dancing. Commoners who were her devotees traveled from all over to hear her music. The royal household did not take kindly to this and attempted to stop her. Mira didn’t let anything stand in her way, though. She started to focus more and more on the spiritual exercises.

Her father-in-law Rana Sangram Singh also perished in combat within a short time, and her brother-in-law Vikram Singh took over as the monarch of Mewar. Such an outward display of affection infuriated him greatly, and at one point he attempted to lock her in her room. It’s also claimed that he twice attempted to poison her to death, but each time she miraculously survived. In the end, she was banished.

Mira returned to her father’s house first. Her relatives, though, also objected to the way she was acting. Mira made the decision to leave Rajasthan and travel to Vrindavan, where her Lord had lived as a child.

Once in Vrindavan, Mira was unrestricted in her service to her master. She lived a hermit’s life there, creating poetry, conversing with other sages, and associating freely with the followers. She traveled on pilgrimages as well, stopping at locations connected to Lord Krishna.

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